A Tale of Three Kings: Insights to Inspire Personal Growth in You

In my previous article… A Tale of Three Kings: Two Lessons to Inspire Growth in You, I highlighted two major lessons that inspired me. This is the last in this series and I hope that as you read and apply these lessons to your life you would grow and mature in your character and relationships.

Before you read further I would encourage you to read the first article and if you can afford it, buy the book. It will challenge your thought process and change your life in a good way.

Here are some of the key things I took away from the concluding part of the book:

  1. David refused to cause harm to King Saul or even cause division in the kingdom. It is very easy for us to take the route of vengeance especially if we are innocent and the person in question is caught in our trap. When David and his men saw King Saul sleeping, his men saw the opportunity as a sign from God. We are quick to make assertions such as…”I have been patient with him/her and even been running away to avoid any kind of trouble but now God has delivered my enemy into my hands…thank you God, now is my turn to serve him/her the bitter pills.” David had the chance to end King Saul’s life but he chose to allow God to do it His own way, he said if God has anointed me king over Israel then at the right time He will enthrone me, I will not hasten the process. You too can imitate this noble act of David. Resist the temptation to be exactly like your adversary, refuse to be influenced negatively by those who chose to repay you evil for the good you did for them.
  2. How can you remain faithful between the promise and the payoff? One funny thing about David’s life was that he was very peaceful and relatively happy before Samuel the prophet anointed him king. With the anointing came envy from King Saul and that was followed by torments, trials, and troubles seeking to kill him. What did God do? Nothing! what did David do? Nothing! David believed and trusted God one hundred percent that he would be enthroned at the appointed time even if he had to spend the entire waiting period in caves and running away. My take away from this point is that, you did not asked to be born, hence, you are here for a purpose and if you believe this, then continue to do the best you can and believe that at the right time you will be enthroned. Destiny can be delayed but it cannot be denied. Maintain a positive attitude while you wait to reap the fruits of your labor.
  3. Are you willing to live through pain, or do you avoid it? This is an important question because it says a lot about your character. In my previous article 10 Character Building Quotes I highlighted some of the quotes I thought would help you to build your character, you should check it out. One of my favorite in that list is number 6: “A gem cannot be polished without friction, nor a man perfected without trials.” – Seneca. David persevered through trials and difficult times. And it was times and difficulties like these that prepared him for the tasks ahead and as it is highlighted in the book, he had to draw from these experiences to handle Absalom’s rebellion. If you are going to achieve something great then expect great trials and difficulties in proportion to the size of your greatness, embrace them, learn from them, grow and mature.
  4. What needs to happen to make you change your good character? At his old age, David’s son Absalom rebelled against him and divided the kingdom. He spoke about his father’s inadequacies, the injustices in the kingdom and how he would make a better king. David was once again caught up in the middle of a battle but this time, with his own son. His men saw this as an insurrection and Just as they advised him in his youth to kill King Saul, he was given the same counsel. The line was drawn between his character and to hold on to power. He had the choice to become Saul and kill Absalom and cling to power or choose his character… “raise no hand” and allow God to decide the matter as he did in the past. David’s character was impeccable, he considered the throne to be God’s, not his own to have, to take, to protect, nor to keep.  He explicitly asserted his desire for God’s will more than His blessings. When Absalom declared himself king, David did nothing…typical of David. He relinquished everything and left the palace but as always God came through and proved Himself mightily to the whole of Israel. If you wish to know how this epic story ended read the book of first and second Samuel.

So what needs to happen to make you change your good character?

How would you respond if similar things were to happen to you?

What needs to happen to put your own inner Saul to death?

Do you agree with David’s commitment to “raise no hand,” or do you find this course too passive?

When can you know when God wants you to take action and when he wants you to accept action taken against you?

Thank you for reading!

Bibobra

 

 

8 thoughts on “A Tale of Three Kings: Insights to Inspire Personal Growth in You

Add yours

  1. Prince Udeogwu. The Tale Of The Three Kings Showed Its Theme As Aforementioned And It Tells Us That Vengeance Of The Lord. … Ride On … For The Work Well Done!!! @Bibobra Alabrah.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. The Tale Of The Three Kings Showed Its Theme As Aforementioned And It Tells Us That Vengeance Of The Lord. … Ride On … For The Work Well Done!!! @Bibobra Alabrah.

    Like

  3. One thing that I especially loved is how the theme of unconditional love is crucial for understanding the lessons, the exact command that Jesus left us as his followers

    Liked by 1 person

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